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Dr. Ronan T. Swords Receives Pap Corps Endowed Professorship in Leukemia

From left, Megan Baker, UM President Donna E. Shalala, Ronan T. Swords, M.D., Ph.D., Stephen D. Nimer, M.D., Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D.

From left, Megan Baker, UM President Donna E. Shalala, Ronan T. Swords, M.D., Ph.D., Stephen D. Nimer, M.D., Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D. Photo GalleryView Photo Gallery

Ronan T. Swords, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine and Director of the Leukemia Program at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, has received the Pap Corps Endowed Professorship in Leukemia. The endowment comes from The Pap Corps: Champions for Cancer Research, a volunteer organization that raises money solely for cancer research at Sylvester.

To date, The Pap Corps has donated more than $51 million to Sylvester, including this year’s record-setting $4.5 million as part of an overall pledge of $25 million to UM’s Momentum2 campaign. That makes the organization the fifth-highest University donor in overall giving.

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UM held a ceremonial groundbreaking last Thursday for The Lennar Foundation Medical Center, scheduled to open on the Coral Gables campus in 2016. From left to right are Lennar Foundation trustees Waynewright Malcolm; Allan Pekor; Marshall Ames, who also serves as chairman of the foundation; and Shelly Rubin; UM President Donna E. Shalala; Lennar Foundation trustee Stuart A. Miller, who chairs the UM Board of Trustees; Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs, Dean of the Miller School of Medicine, and CEO of UHealth; Joe Natoli, UM Senior Vice President for Business and Finance and Chief Financial Officer; and Thomas J. LeBlanc, UM Executive Vice President and Provost.

Gift of $50 Million to Name UHealth’s New Coral Gables Medical Center

The Lennar Foundation, the charitable arm of The Lennar Corporation, one of the nation’s largest builders of quality homes, has given a lead gift of $50 million to name the UHealth at Coral Gables ambulatory center. A ceremonial groundbreaking event for The Lennar Foundation Medical Center took place last Thursday afternoon.

Read more about The Lennar Foundation Medical Center »

Suzanne Lechner, Ph.D.

Community-Based Programs Reduce Stress for Black Breast Cancer Survivors

A team of researchers at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center has found that a community-based stress management intervention program improved the psychological adaptation of underserved black breast cancer survivors. They also found that an educational program providing post-treatment breast cancer health and wellness information had a similar effect.

Read more about the research results »

From left, Shivank Bhatia, M.D., Dipen Parekh, M.D., Bruce Kava, M.D., Christopher Gomez, M.D., and Sanoj Punnen, M.D.

Miller School Researchers to Study New Treatment for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

The Miller School of Medicine has been awarded a $470,000 grant to be part of a multicenter clinical trial to evaluate an emerging treatment option for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), an enlarged prostate, which affects more than 50 percent of men over age 50. With this approval from the Food and Drug Administration, the University of Miami will be one of just ten sites in the nation and the second site in South Florida.

Read more about the clinical trial »

From left, Vance Lemmon, Ph.D., Ubbo Visser, Ph.D., M.Sc., Stephan Schürer, Ph.D., and  Christopher Mader.

UM Awarded NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Grant

A team of University of Miami researchers is part of a trio of institutions that have been awarded a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to create a Center to integrate and analyze large and diverse datasets of cellular signatures as part of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative. The award, of which there is only one in the nation, is to create a Data Coordination and Integration Center.

Read more about the grant »

Alberto Ramos, M.D., M.S.P.H.

New Study Suggests Untreated Sleep Apnea Can Lead to Diabetes and Hypertension in Hispanics

Hispanics in the U.S. at risk for cardiovascular disease also have a high prevalence of sleep apnea, which is often undiagnosed, suggesting the untreated sleep disorder can lead to diabetes and hypertension in this population, according to an analysis of the results of the landmark Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (SOL).

Read more about the study »

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