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UM Miller School of Medicine Ranks in Top 50 of U.S. Medical Schools
4/15/2010

Miller School of Medicine ranks No. 47 in U.S. News annual survey of graduate programs.
Miller School of Medicine ranks No. 47 in U.S. News annual survey of graduate programs.

The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine has climbed four spots to No. 47 in the 2011 edition of "America's Best Graduate Schools" published by U.S. News & World Report.

"This prestigious ranking from U.S. News is further evidence of the high caliber of our students, our education and the research being conducted at the Miller School of Medicine," said Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs and Dean of the Miller School. "To be ranked in the top 50 of research medical schools reflects our deep commitment to educating the medical leaders of tomorrow, while making the discoveries that will help patients in South Florida and around the world."

Each year, U.S. News ranks professional-school programs in business, education, engineering, law, and medicine. In the medical school research rankings, 120 schools provided the data needed to calculate the rankings. The medical school research model is based on a weighted average of eight indicators including quality assessment, peer assessment, research activity, and student selectivity.



Amir Jaffer, M.D., Honored with Society of Hospital Medicine's 2010 Excellence in Teaching Award
4/15/2010

Amir K. Jaffer was honored with the 2010 Excellence in Teaching Award by the Society of Hospital Medicine.
Amir K. Jaffer, M.D., was honored with the 2010 Excellence in Teaching Award by the Society of Hospital Medicine.

Amir K. Jaffer, M.D., associate professor of medicine at the Miller School and chief of the Division of Hospital Medicine, has been honored with the Society of Hospital Medicine's Award for Excellence in Teaching. The Philadelphia-based society, the national group that represents hospitalists, recognized Dr. Jaffer at its 2010 annual meeting in Washington, D.C., April 8-11.

Dr. Jaffer, who is renowned in the fast-growing field of hospital medicine, was recognized for his dynamic leadership in spearheading the growth of the University of Miami Health System's (UHealth) Division of Hospital Medicine from a team of five to 27 academic hospitalists within two years, and for building educational programs for medical students, internal medicine residents and faculty. He developed and directs the annual Perioperative Medicine Summit, the Miller School's most highly attended CME course, held in conjunction with the Society of Perioperative Medicine and Quality Improvement.



Miller School Genetic Researchers Identify New Gene Associated with Increased Risk of Alzheimer's Disease
4/13/2010

Margaret Pericak-Vance, Ph.D.
Margaret Pericak-Vance, Ph.D.

A gene that appears to increase a person's risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease, the most common type of the disease, has been identified by a team of researchers led by Margaret Pericak-Vance, Ph.D., director of the John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

The research was presented as part of the late-breaking science program at the American Academy of Neurology's 62nd Annual Meeting in Toronto this week. The gene, abbreviated MTHFD1L, is located on chromosome six.

"Only recently have common variants in genes other than APOE been convincingly shown to be associated with a person's risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease," said Dr. Pericak-Vance, senior author and principal investigator of the study.



Miller School and Miami Project Researchers Publish New Research on the Use of Mild Hypothermia in Spinal Cord Injuries
4/12/2010

Allan Levi, M.D., Ph.D.
Allan Levi, M.D., Ph.D.

A study published by researchers from the Miller School's Department of Neurological Surgery and The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis offers evidence that the use of mild hypothermia is both a safe and potentially effective strategy in acute spinal cord injury.

More than two years ago, NFL player and former Miami Hurricane Kevin Everett suffered a spinal cord injury and many believed he would never walk again. Everett was given a hypothermic treatment, the introduction of a cold saline solution that is thought to decrease damage to the spinal cord, while being transported to the hospital. It was a treatment Everett's doctor learned about through the cutting-edge research pioneered by scientists at The Miami Project.

A team led by Allan Levi, M.D., Ph.D., professor of neurological surgery, clinical researcher at The Miami Project and chief of the neurospine service at Jackson Memorial Hospital, published their findings in this month's issue of Neurosurgery.



Statue Honoring Harcourt M. Sylvester Jr. Unveiled at Gala Reception
4/9/2010

From left, front row, W. Jarrard Goodwin, M.D., Jayne S. Malfitano and Laura Cameron with the Harcourt M. Sylvester Jr. statue. Back row, Bernard Fogel, M.D., Joseph Rosenblatt, M.D., and Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D.
From left, front row, W. Jarrard Goodwin, M.D., Jayne S. Malfitano and Laura Cameron with the Harcourt M. Sylvester Jr. statue. Back row, Bernard Fogel, M.D., Joseph Rosenblatt, M.D., and Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D.

The Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center wrote another chapter in its history Thursday evening, unveiling a bronze statue of its benefactor, the late Harcourt M. Sylvester Jr. A crowd of more than seventy people — including Sylvester's daughters, Jayne Malfitano and Laura Cameron — gathered in the courtyard just outside the cancer center for the event.

Joan Scheiner, chairman of the Sylvester Board of Governors, began the presentation with a surprise announcement. Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado and City Commissioner Willy Gort declared April 8, 2010 Harcourt M. Sylvester Jr. Statue Dedication Day.



Miller School Pediatric Researchers Find Children with HIV Benefit From Exercise
4/8/2010

The children participated in an exercise program in a gym at the Batchelor Children's Research Institute.
The children participated in an exercise program in a gym at the Batchelor Children's Research Institute.

Children and adolescents infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, can benefit from a structured exercise program, according to findings by pediatric researchers at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. The new NIH-funded research was published in the March issue of the journal AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses.

"It's been well documented that physical activity contributes to positive health outcomes in adults with HIV, but limited research has been done to see if an exercise treatment program can help children and adolescents who are HIV-infected," said Tracie Miller, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the Miller School and lead author of the article titled "The effect of a structured exercise program on nutrition and fitness outcomes in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children."

"We wanted to determine if a hospital-based exercise training program followed by a home-based program for children and adolescents with HIV is feasible and safe, and if it improves their fitness, strength and changes body composition."



Sylvester Surgeons Perform First Removal of Throat Cancer in South Florida Using Surgical Robot
4/8/2010

Dr. Francisco Civantos (center) performs robotic removal of throat cancer at University of Miami Hospital. OR Technician Michel De La Cruz (left) assists.
Dr. Francisco Civantos (center) performs robotic removal of throat cancer at University of Miami Hospital. OR Technician Michel De La Cruz (left) assists.

Surgeons from the Department of Otolaryngology at UHealth – the University of Miami Health System have performed the first removal of throat cancer in South Florida using a surgical robot. The operation was performed March 22nd at the University of Miami Hospital by Francisco Civantos, M.D., associate professor of otolaryngology and member of the Head and Neck Cancer Site Disease Group at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Giovana Thomas, M.D., associate professor of otolaryngology and member of the Head and Neck Cancer Site Disease Group at Sylvester. They were accompanied by Raymond J. Leveillee, M.D., professor of urology, who is an experienced urologic robotic surgeon.

Dr. Giovana Thomas, associate professor of otolaryngology
Dr. Giovana Thomas, associate professor of otolaryngology

Traditional surgery for various head and neck cancers requires large incisions – extending from the lip, across the chin and to the neck before entering the mouth or throat. Numerous times surgeons need to cut through the lower jaw and move aside vital nerves to gain access to the back of the mouth and throat. By using the da Vinci® Surgical System, surgeons insert the slender instruments into the mouth to reach the base of the tongue, tonsils, and throat. "As a surgeon," says Civantos, "using a surgical robot allows for greater precision and dexterity to remove cancerous tumors from tight spaces in the mouth and throat."

The University of Miami Hospital's da Vinci® System consists of robotic arms that replicate a surgeon's motions. Throughout a robot-assisted surgery, patients are positioned as they would be during laparoscopic surgery, with surgical team members surrounding them, while the surgeon is located at a console a few feet away. Supporting surgical team members mount the correct instruments, and supervise the laparoscopic arms and tools being used.



Two Miller School Faculty Members Elected to Prestigious ASCI Honor Society
4/6/2010

Maria Abreu, M.D., and Myles Wolf, M.D.
Maria Abreu, M.D., and Myles Wolf, M.D.

Two Miller School of Medicine physician-scientists have been elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI), one of the nation's oldest and most respected medical honor societies. Maria Abreu, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Gastroenterology, and Myles Wolf, M.D., MMSc., associate professor of medicine, director of the Clinical Research Center and assistant dean for translational and clinical research, will be introduced as new members at the organization's annual meeting on April 23 in Chicago.

Since members must be 45 or younger at the time of their election, ASCI membership generally honors their early-career scientific research accomplishments.
"The ASCI considers the nominations of several hundred physician-scientists from around the world each year, and only elects up to 80 new members, so to have two of those members be from the Miller School is truly an extraordinary accomplishment," said Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D. "It is quite an honor for these two faculty members to be recognized for their spectacular research achievements."



Miller School Launches Web Site Detailing Faculty Disclosure Information
4/2/2010

As part of its dedication to upholding high ethical standards in research and educational interactions between faculty and private companies, the Miller School launched a Web site that details faculty members' outside professional activities.
As part of its dedication to upholding high ethical standards in research and educational interactions between faculty and private companies, the Miller School launched a Web site that details faculty members' outside professional activities.

The Miller School has taken an important new step in an effort to uphold the highest ethical standards as an institution by launching a publicly accessible Web site detailing outside professional activities disclosed by medical school faculty during the University's 2009 fiscal year. These activities include research and educational interactions between faculty members and private companies such as drug manufacturers and device makers.

"With this step we join the ranks of a small but growing number of leading academic medical centers to publicly report the outside professional activities of faculty physicians and scientists," said Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D. "This enhanced disclosure initiative is the next logical step in the contract of trust we have with our patients and our community."

The Web site (www.med.miami.edu/about/opa.asp) is searchable by the name of the faculty member or the name of a company, and will be updated at least annually. Future refinements to the Web site will include the amount of compensation faculty members receive for their outside professional activities. The initiative to ensure accurate self-reporting of such outside professional activities is being supported by the Medical School Council and the University of Miami Medical Group governing board, along with senior University leadership.



Karl L. Magleby, Ph.D., Wins 2009-10 Provostís Award for Scholarly Activity
3/30/2010

Karl L. Magleby, Ph.D., winner of the 2009-2010 Provostís Award for Scholarly Activity, is congratulated by President Donna E. Shalala and Provost Thomas J. LeBlanc.
Karl L. Magleby, Ph.D., winner of the 2009-2010 Provostís Award for Scholarly Activity, is congratulated by President Donna E. Shalala and Provost Thomas J. LeBlanc.

In recognition of his breakthrough research on the nervous system, Karl L. Magleby, Ph.D., professor and chair of physiology and biophysics, is a recipient of the 2009-10 Provost’s Award for Scholarly Activity.

Thomas J. LeBlanc, Ph.D., executive vice president and provost, officially presented Magleby with the award at a luncheon held Monday in his honor and that of the two other recipients. He was nominated for the award by Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D.

“It is an honor to be recognized for my work,” said Dr. Magleby, whose research has been consistently funded by the NIH for more than 30 years.



Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., Announces Leadership Changes in Medical Education
3/30/2010

Mark O'Connell, M.D. assumes his new role April 1 as senior associate dean for education development and senior advisor to the senior vice president for medical affairs and dean.
Mark O'Connell, M.D., assumes his new role April 1 as senior associate dean for education development and senior advisor to the senior vice president for medical affairs and dean.

Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., has announced a number of changes in the leadership of the medical student education programs. Mark O'Connell, M.D., is stepping down after serving for almost 11 years as senior associate dean for medical education. Under his leadership, undergraduate medical education programs underwent significant changes and growth, including major curriculum reform, implementation of information technology support systems for education, creation of the Academic Societies program, creation of the medical student Department of Community Service, enrollment of students from a national applicant pool, and the creation of the Miller School's Regional Campus in Boca Raton at Florida Atlantic University.

Having recently led the medical school through its self-study by which the school gained full eight-year LCME accreditation, Dr. O'Connell will now assume a new position as senior associate dean for educational development and senior advisor to the senior vice president for medical affairs and dean. This role will allow him to focus on fulfilling a crucial priority for the school's medical education programs: Developing and implementing a system for recognizing and rewarding the teaching efforts of our faculty. This will include establishing a new Academy of Distinguished Educators at the Miller School. With his experience in curriculum design and developing the regional medical campus program, Dr. O'Connell will also work with Dean Goldschmidt in establishing satellite medical education programs with global partners.



Physical Therapists Playing Critical Role in Post-Earthquake Haiti
3/22/2010

Teresa Glynn and Dr. Robert Gailey administer physical therapy to a patient in Haiti.
Teresa Glynn and Dr. Robert Gailey administer physical therapy to a patient in Haiti.

Haitiís devastating January 12 earthquake left hundreds of thousands of people dead, tons of rubble scattered along the streets of Port-au-Prince and thousands of new amputees in a nation that relies heavily on its workers for physical labor. Many people within the disabled population in Haiti have historically not been able to earn a living, and have been tucked away out of sight due to the social stigma that physical disability can bring.† With such large volumes of newly disabled, the Haitian people may be redefining their concept of disability, and discovering the productive roles the disabled play in the United States and elsewhere in the world. Itís a paradigm shift that is creating an enormous need for education and rehabilitation --- and UM physical therapists are taking the lead in filling that critical role.



Miller School Faculty and Staff Get Ready for the next 'UM Family Night with the Marlins'
3/24/2010

Dozens of faculty and staff including (from left) Diana Wile, Jennifer Hernandez and Tara DiJohn, from the Department of Pediatrics, received tickets for the fifth annual
Dozens of faculty and staff including (from left) Diana Wile, Jennifer Hernandez and Tara DiJohn, from the Department of Pediatrics, received tickets for the fifth annual "UM Family Night with the Marlins" scheduled for May 1.

Sun Life Stadium almost certainly will be a sea of green and orange on May 1 when the Marlins take on the Washington Nationals. That game night is also the date for the next "UM Family Night with the Marlins," a tradition, now in its fifth year, where the game and ancillary festivities will become one big celebration of the phenomenal faculty and staff who are responsible for the University's continuing record of success.

On Wednesday, Miller School employees seemed to be getting in the spirit, with dozens lining up for the tickets that will allow them, family members and friends into the highly anticipated event hosted by the president and provost.

"I'm very excited to be going," said Jorge Aguilar, as he and four IT division co-workers collected their tickets. "It's a great way for us to extend our relationships outside work and get to know each other's friends and families. The University is one big family."



Humanitarian Award Presented to Miller School Physician
3/26/2010

Stephen Symes, M.D., has been presented with the Arthur Helton Humanitarian Award by the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center.
Stephen Symes, M.D., has been presented with the Arthur Helton Humanitarian Award by the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center.

The Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center (FIAC) has honored Miller School faculty member Stephen Symes, M.D., associate professor of medicine, for his work on behalf of immigrants. Last month Dr. Symes was given FIAC's Arthur Helton Humanitarian Award during an awards dinner in downtown Miami.

In 2009 Dr. Symes played a key role in helping an FIAC client in Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody get urgently needed surgery. Dr. Symes' medical opinion, which was based on the woman's medical records, helped win a federal court lawsuit ordering her treatment.



The Class of 2010 Celebrates Match Day with Tears of Joy and Shouts of Glee
3/19/2010

With his three sons in tow, Anthony Daniyan sees the word he hoped for: Cornell.
With his three sons in tow, Anthony Daniyan sees the word he hoped for: Cornell.

Kicking off the Miller School Class of 2010’s Match Day, Aylin Tansel spelled out the rules to fellow fourth-year medical students anxiously waiting to learn where they’ll spend the next three to seven years in residency training:

When your name is called, come to the stage. Pose for the camera. Open the envelope. Toss $5 in the basket. Put a sticker on the map marking your destination. But, most of all, “be really proud and excited because you worked really hard to get there.’’

Few in the boisterous crowd gathered under the white party tent on the Schoninger Research Quadrangle Thursday had trouble complying with Tansel’s instructions.

Angela Dunn jumped up and down and screamed “Oh, my God!’’ upon learning she’d be heading to Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles for her obstetrics-gynecology residency.

Naureen Farid is shocked and elated to be heading to the UT Southwestern Medical Center.
Naureen Farid is shocked and elated to be heading to the UT Southwestern Medical Center.

David Dunhill pumped his fist in the air when he tore open his envelope and read he’d be doing his internal medicine training at Emory University. “That’s kind of a surprise,’’ he said. “It was my first choice but I got a sort of last-second interview there.’’

Anthony Daniyan let out a huge sigh of relief before belting out the only word he had hoped to see next to internal medicine: “Cornell!”

“I’m going back to New York City,’’ Daniyan exalted, after hugging his wife and texting his mom in Nigeria with news of his next locale. “I’m so excited. I have family there. My wife’s family is there. We’ll be broke as hell but I love that city.’’







Ransom Everglades Students Applauded for Generosity to Haiti
3/16/2010

Dr. Barth Green (left) and Dr. Pascal J. Goldschmidt (right), on stage at Ransom Everglades Upper School with Ellen Moceri, Head of School.
Dr. Barth Green (left) and Dr. Pascal J. Goldschmidt (right), on stage at Ransom Everglades Upper School with Ellen Moceri, Head of School.

When Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., and Barth Green, M.D., professor and chair of neurological surgery, addressed a packed auditorium of high school students Friday morning, the message wasn’t about medicine, but about the power of giving. Dean Goldschmidt and Dr. Green thanked the students of Ransom Everglades Upper School for raising nearly $30,000 for the University of Miami’s Haiti relief effort.

Just one day after the January 12 earthquake struck Port-au-Prince, Head of School Ellen Moceri put the word out. She “saw the devastation and knew we had to jump in,” asking all students, teachers and staff to donate $10 to the University of Miami Global Institute. They answered the call in a way that no one expected, coming up with nearly $30,000 in less than 48 hours.



UM Miller School of Medicine Records Large Growth in Research Funding
3/16/2010

Researchers at the Miller School of Medicine experience a large increase in funding from the NIH, including money from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
Researchers at the Miller School of Medicine experience a large increase in funding from the NIH, including money from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

The research enterprise at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine has reached a new milestone in funding from the National Institutes of Health. Propelled in large part by stimulus grants, the Miller School has moved into the top third of all U.S. medical schools that receive money from the NIH, gaining major market share relative to other U.S. medical schools.

During fiscal year 2009, which ended on September 30, 2009, the Miller School received a total of $122.8 million in NIH funding to move from No. 43 to No. 41, ahead of the Ohio State University, the University of California-Davis, and Ivy League Dartmouth, according to preliminary data just released by the NIH. Of that figure, $25.9 million came from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding of the NIH, designed to stimulate the economy. The Miller School ranked No. 32 out of 123 medical schools in the amount of stimulus funding received.



Nanette H. Bishopric, M.D., Earns Distinguished Scientist Award for Research on Novel Treatments
3/16/2010

Nanette H. Bishopric, M.D.
Nanette H. Bishopric, M.D.

A Miller School physician-scientist has received one of the most prestigious awards presented by the American College of Cardiology. Nanette H. Bishopric, M.D., professor of medicine, molecular and cellular pharmacology and pediatrics, received the 2010 Distinguished Scientist Award (Basic Domain) at the convocation of the College's 59th Annual Scientific Session in Atlanta on Monday.

The honor is bestowed each year on a Fellow of the College who has made major contributions to the advancement of scientific knowledge in the field of cardiovascular diseases.

In his nomination letter, Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., noted that, with heart failure reaching pandemic proportions in the United States, Dr. Bishopric's "important work on understanding the role of cardiac apoptosis is crucial to our understanding of the pathogenesis of heart failure." He cited her seminal contributions to "our understanding of the regulation of ischemia-activated death pathways in various forms of cardiac injury, and equally important observations regarding the regulation of cardiac hypertrophy."



Miller School's D-CFAR Hosts Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, Nobel Laureate and Renowned HIV Expert
3/12/2010

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, Ph.D., co-winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize for Medicine for the discovery of HIV, presented
Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, Ph.D., co-winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize for Medicine for the discovery of HIV, presented "What Can We Learn from the Diverse Spectrum of HIV/SIV Infections?" at a D-CFAR-sponsored event at the Miller School.

The Miller School's Developmental Center for AIDS Research (D-CFAR) hosted one of the world's foremost scientists engaged in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, Ph.D., co-winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize for Medicine for the discovery of HIV, presented an hour-long lecture, "What Can We Learn from the Diverse Spectrum of HIV/SIV Infections?" to faculty and students at the Lois Pope LIFE Center auditorium on Thursday.

After opening remarks by Savita Pahwa, M.D., professor of microbiology and immunology and director of D-CFAR, and an introduction by Helena Schmidtmayerova, Ph.D., research assistant professor of microbiology and immunology and Barré-Sinoussi's former student, the Nobel laureate gave a detailed review of the discovery of HIV, immunopathogenesis of HIV infection, and treatment strategies developed over the years. During the presentation, Barré-Sinoussi also shed light on the research being undertaken by two teams in her Paris-based labs at the Institut Pasteur, where she is acting director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Unit.


Pinning Ceremony Marks Official Welcome to Medicine for the Class of 2013
3/08/2010

David Hafler, M.D., '78, chair of Yale University's neurology department and a 2010 Miller School Hall of Fame inductee, pins Lauren Podkowirow at the John G. Clarkson Freshman Pinning Ceremony for the Class of 2013. Eric Chavoustie (far left) of the Class of 2011 looks on while Michael King waits to be pinned.
David Hafler, M.D., '78, chair of Yale University's neurology department and a 2010 Miller School Hall of Fame inductee, pins Lauren Podkowirow at the John G. Clarkson Freshman Pinning Ceremony for the Class of 2013. Eric Chavoustie (far left) of the Class of 2011 looks on while Michael King waits to be pinned.

With proud parents, supportive friends, faculty and classmates watching from the audience, the Miller School formally welcomed the Class of 2013 to the medical profession. Following encouraging words from Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., and a keynote address by Barth Green, M.D., professor and chair of neurological surgery and among the first to rush to Haiti after the recent earthquake, students in the 198-member class ascended the stage in pairs to be awarded the special pin.

"This milestone, named in honor of my esteemed predecessor, signals that you have almost completed your first year of study at the Miller School of Medicine," Goldschmidt said Friday during the tenth annual John G. Clarkson Freshman Pinning Ceremony, named for the Dean Emeritus in 2006.

"You are officially today entering a very important family, the family of physicians who are graduates of the Miller School of Medicine, a strong and distinguished group. We are so proud of you. You have a pretty good sense of what it will take to become a physician - extremely hard work and focus and commitment - and no fun, and no sleep at night," Goldschmidt continued, eliciting laughter from the students. "But we will do all we need to, to make sure that by the day we give you the diploma that tells society you are deemed responsible and educated to the point you can take care of the most precious asset of any human being - our health - we will say to society, 'You can.'"



Awards Banquet Gathering Hears About Haiti, Distinguished Grads
3/08/2010

Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., new Hall of Fame inductee David Hafler, M.D. '78, and Alberto Mitrani, M.D., '84, chair of the Alumni Awards Selection Committee.
Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., new Hall of Fame inductee David Hafler, M.D. '78, and Alberto Mitrani, M.D., '84, chair of the Alumni Awards Selection Committee.

A record Miller School alumni crowd attended the annual Medical Alumni Weekend Awards Banquet Saturday night, March 6, at the Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables.

More than 300 graduates, along with family members and friends, watched in rapt silence as Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., played a slide show and a video that highlighted the medical school's stalwart earthquake relief efforts in Haiti.

"We played an instrumental role in establishing a 240-bed temporary hospital that's still in operation as I speak," Dean Goldschmidt said in a Biltmore ballroom where two large video screens showed Miller School personnel in Port-au-Prince. "I wish all of you could have seen the selfless work performed by our doctors. Each of you would have been inspired by the way your colleagues conducted themselves."



UM's D-CFAR Hosts Timely Symposium on Aging with HIV
3/08/2010

Tracie Miller, M.D., director of pediatric clinical research, discussed
Tracie Miller, M.D., director of pediatric clinical research, discussed "Long-Term Consequences of Perinatal HIV Infection from Birth" at the 7th Annual HIV Symposium.

Three decades into the AIDS crisis, the population of people living with HIV is aging. In fact, 25 percent of people newly diagnosed with HIV in Miami-Dade County are older than 50 and, by 2015, half of the HIV patients treated by University of Miami/Jackson Memorial specialists will have surpassed the half-century mark.

It is against this demographic backdrop that the University of Miami Developmental Center for AIDS Research (D-CFAR) hosted the 7th Annual HIV Winter Symposium on a timely continuing education topic: Aging and HIV Infection.

More than 70 physicians and other health care professionals attended the one-day course at the University of Miami Hospital Seminar Center, where participants learned to distinguish the natural consequences of aging from those caused by the AIDS virus, implement strategies for managing elderly patients infected with the virus, and contrast the relative risks of HIV and antiretroviral therapy on metabolic and cardiovascular changes at various ages.



William O'Neill, M.D., Recounts 50 Years of Cardiovascular Advances in Lemberg Lecture
3/05/2010

William O'Neill, M.D., who was honored with a plaque for the 18th Miriam Lemberg lecture, is flanked by, from left, Joshua Hare, M.D., Miriam Lemberg, Louis Lemberg, M.D., Mauro Moscucci, M.D., and Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D.
William O'Neill, M.D., who was honored with a plaque for the 18th Miriam Lemberg lecture, is flanked by, from left, Joshua Hare, M.D., Miriam Lemberg, Louis Lemberg, M.D., Mauro Moscucci, M.D., and Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D.

When William W. O'Neill, M.D., executive dean for clinical affairs, was an intern and resident in the late 1970s, doctors could offer little more than hope to patients who suffered severe heart attacks.

"All we did for patients with acute myocardial infarction is give them nitroglycerin, give them morphine and put them to bed," O'Neill recalled Wednesday as he delivered the 18th annual Miriam Lemberg Visiting Professorship in Cardiovascular Disease lecture. "That's all that we had and we hoped they would survive."

Twenty-five years later, thanks to tremendous strides in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, the life expectancy of patients who have suffered heart attacks has been extended by 10 years, a dramatic improvement that, as O'Neill noted, did not happen by magic, or by decree. It happened by hard work, and through the passion and perseverance of cardiologists who dared to push their field into new, often unpopular directions with therapies once considered "heretical."



Sylvester Researchers Awarded Five-Year Grant to Study Cancer Viruses
3/05/2010

Edward Harhaj, Ph.D., Glen N. Barber, Ph.D., and Juan Carlos Ramos, M.D.
Edward Harhaj, Ph.D., Glen N. Barber, Ph.D., and Juan Carlos Ramos, M.D.

Viruses are believed to be the cause of as many as 20 percent of all cancers, but some viruses can infect human cells and remain latent. To remain latent, they may have to suppress anti-viral host mechanisms, which can pave the way for cancer. The laboratory of Glen N. Barber, Ph.D., the Eugenia J. Dodson Chair in Cancer Research and leader of the Viral Oncology Program at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has played a key role in unraveling these host mechanisms, referred to as innate immunity.

Barber is now leading a team of physicians and scientists at Sylvester who have been awarded a prestigious five-year PO1 grant from the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, to uncover these mechanisms and study them in clinical trials.

This $8 million grant from the NCI involves multiple investigators. Barber and two other Sylvester researchers will take a three-pronged approach to studying these viral malignancies. "This is a basic research grant with a clinical component," explains Barber. "We had to show synergy and a solid blend among all the components."



University of Miami Field Hospital in Haiti Establishes Telemedicine with Support from Swinfen Charitable Trust
3/08/2010

Telemedicine will help bring specialty care to the relief effort in Haiti following the massive earthquake in January.
Telemedicine will help bring specialty care to the relief effort in Haiti following the massive earthquake in January.

The University of Miami's relief effort in Haiti is expanding its reach with the help of telemedicine and the generosity of an international trust. UM's TeleHealth Program has forged an agreement with the Swinfen Charitable Trust (SCT) to use its web-based telemedicine system for specialty consultation for patients at the University of Miami Hospital in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti. Consultations will be provided by physicians from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and the University of Virginia (UVA) Health System, who are already part of the Swinfen global consultant network.

The Swinfen Charitable Trust was set up by Lord and Lady Swinfen of the United Kingdom in 1998, with the aim of assisting poor, sick and disabled people in the developing world. The Trust facilitates a low-cost telemedicine service linking doctors at hospitals in the developing world with leading medical and surgical consultants. For the hundreds of thousands of Haitians injured in the January earthquake, it will connect physicians on the ground with specialists in a multitude of disciplines at UM and UVA.

Anne E. Burdick, M.D., M.P.H., associate dean for telehealth and clinical outreach at the Miller School and longtime consultant to SCT, says being able to use a low bandwidth system is beneficial as Haiti recovers from the massive earthquake. "Because so much of Haiti's communications infrastructure has been destroyed," says Burdick, "finding alternative methods to transmit medical information has become crucial."



UM Hosts Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Engineering Joint Regional Meeting
3/02/2010

Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., speaking on a panel at a joint meeting of the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine. President Shalala moderated the event, which was hosted by the University and addressed
Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., speaking on a panel at a joint meeting of the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine. President Shalala moderated the event, which was hosted by the University and addressed "Engineering Innovations in Health Care."

On the same day that President Barack Obama and Congressional representatives met in Washington to discuss health care reform, a historic gathering of a different sort–one composed not of lawmakers, but of scientists and scholars–convened on the University of Miami Coral Gables campus to address the issue from another perspective: how the field of engineering can help improve medical care for the benefit of all.

"When you think about the future of health care, there's no question that the ideas, ideals, and capacities of engineering have a great deal both to offer and to gain from a closer collaboration with the counterparts in health care for improving health in our country and around the world," Harvey Fineberg, M.D., Ph.D., president of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), told an audience of more than 300 people at UM's Storer Auditorium on February 25.

His comments were part of the first-of-its-kind joint regional meeting between the Institute and the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). The summit, organized by UM College of Engineering Dean James M. Tien, Ph.D., and Distinguished Research Professor Daniel Berg, Ph.D., featured presentations by scientists and physicians‚ÄĒamong them Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D. – and a panel discussion, moderated by UM President Donna E. Shalala, that focused on the role of engineering in improving health care.



 

Miller School and Jackson Memorial Medical Campus Now Smoke Free
3/02/2010

Ted Vana, D.O. (far right) officially breaks ground on the first
Ted Vana, D.O. (far right) officially breaks ground on the first "Smoke Free Campus" sign, with the help of Arthur Fournier, M.D., (left), Asma Aftab, Ph.D., research assistant professor of family medicine and community health, and Richard Thurer, M.D.

The Miller School of Medicine, UHealth - University of Miami Health System and Jackson Health System medical campus is now smoke free. The health care systems officially opened the new chapter yesterday. The initiative aims to "promote health and to promote wellness for everyone," said Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D. in announcing the project.

There are now dozens of "Smoke Free Campus" signs sprinkled across the medical campus, reminding all employees, students, patients and visitors of the new policy. The first of those signs was erected last Thursday at a groundbreaking ceremony at Alamo Park, attended by the committee behind the Smoke Free Campus Initiative.


 

Miami Transplant Institute Honors Alonzo Mourning with First Humanitarian Award
2/26/2010

Alonzo Mourning was honored with the inaugural MTI Humanitarian Award. Also pictured, from left, Linda Corey, Eneida Roldan, M.D., UM President Donna E. Shalala, Phil Corey, and Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D.
Alonzo Mourning was honored with the inaugural MTI Humanitarian Award. Also pictured, from left, Linda Corey, Eneida Roldan, M.D., UM President Donna E. Shalala, Phil Corey, and Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D.

When the man of the moment, Miami Heat all star and philanthropist Alonzo Mourning, walked on stage to accept the inaugural Miami Transplant Institute Humanitarian Award, a crowd of nearly 400 stood up and applauded thunderously. Mourning, with customary humility, thanked the presenter, UM President Donna E. Shalala, and the audience, which included several of his fellow organ transplant recipients.

Mourning, who underwent a kidney transplant in 2003, became spokesman for the Transplant Institute in 2008 and has been spreading the word about the skilled surgical teams that perform more than 500 life-saving adult and pediatric transplants each year, making the institute one of the busiest in the nation.

"This is definitely an amazing honor," Mourning said at the Wednesday evening event. "I am very proud and I am very humbled to stand here and receive this. Like President Shalala said, I don't do any of this for awards. My philanthropic work is done because I have received so many blessings, so many gifts, and they would be worthless if I didn't share them."


 

The New England Journal of Medicine Showcases Miller School Insights on Providing Rapid Medical Relief in Haiti
2/24/2010

The Miller School's first responders in Haiti turned a storage tent at a United Nations compound into an emergency room.
The Miller School's first responders in Haiti turned a storage tent at a United Nations compound into an emergency room.

In an article published today in The New England Journal of Medicine, six Miller School faculty members involved in the University's initial response to Haiti's catastrophic earthquake shared valuable insights on organizing immediate emergency care for future disasters.

The article, "Rapid Medical Relief - Project Medishare and the Haitian Earthquake," was published in the prestigious weekly journal's online Perspective section.

The authors are Enrique Ginzburg, M.D., professor of surgery and co-director of neuroscience intensive care; William W. O'Neill, M.D., executive dean for clinical affairs; Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., senior vice president for medical affairs and CEO of UHealth; Eduardo de Marchena, M.D., associate dean for international medicine; Daniel Pust, M.D., surgical critical care fellow; and Barth Green, M.D., professor and chair of neurological surgery whose 15 years of humanitarian work in Haiti with Project Medishare facilitated the rapid response.


 

Sylvester Researchers Discover Regulating Mechanism of Key Transcription Factor
2/25/2010

Noula Shembade, Ph.D., and Edward Harhaj, Ph.D.
Noula Shembade, Ph.D., and Edward Harhaj, Ph.D.

In many cancers, scientists have discovered that key gene regulators which normally control cell growth have either been turned off or mutated. That change in the regular pattern then allows unrestricted cell production and the creation of tumors. Sylvester researchers have discovered exactly how one critical regulator affects a transcription factor that is consistently turned on in most cancers. The findings of Edward W. Harhaj, Ph.D., assistant professor of microbiology and immunology and member of the Viral Oncology Program at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and Noula Shembade, Ph.D., research assistant professor of microbiology and immunology, have been published in the February 26 issue of the prestigious journal Science.

Transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-ΚB) regulates hundreds of genes that are involved in a wide variety of different functions such as inflammation, cell development and cell death. When NF-ΚB is functioning normally, for instance during an infection, certain cytokines will be produced and they will activate NF-ΚB for a brief period of time. During that time, NF-ΚB activates specific genes and then it's shut off. If NF-ΚB is not tightly regulated, it stays on continuously which can lead to auto-immune diseases and unregulated cell growth that can become cancer.


 

Sylvester Hosts 8th Annual Landon-AACR Cancer Research Award Lectures
3/1/2010

Charles Sawyers, M.D., Gregory Tochtrop, Ph.D., Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., Stephen Baylin, M.D., Nance Guilmartin, Peter Jones, Ph.D., D.Sc., W. Jarrard Goodwin, M.D., and Augusto Villaneuva, M.D.
Charles Sawyers, M.D., Gregory Tochtrop, Ph.D., Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., Stephen Baylin, M.D., Nance Guilmartin, Peter Jones, Ph.D., D.Sc., W. Jarrard Goodwin, M.D., and Augusto Villaneuva, M.D.

The Miller School's Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center proudly hosted the American Association for Cancer Research and Kirk A. Landon and Dorothy P. Landon Foundation awards and lectures on Friday, February 26, with Kirk Landon on hand to personally congratulate the winners.

These awards are considered the most prestigious given to cancer researchers by their peers, and include a cash prize of $100,000 for each award. Landon told the young researchers and medical students in the audience for the eighth annual awards that he looked forward to seeing them "follow in the footsteps" of the recipients.

This year's Kirk A. Landon-AACR Prize for Basic Cancer Research was jointly awarded to Peter A. Jones, Ph.D., D.Sc., director of the University of Southern California/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center and distinguished professor of urology, biochemistry and molecular biology at the Keck School of Medicine, and Stephen B. Baylin, M.D., professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins University. Jones and Baylin were recognized for their work in the field of epigenetics.


 

GEAR Enrolls 100th Participant and Turns Early Recruits into Devoted Fans
2/24/2010

Bob Radziewicz, director of print and online journalism at the UM School of Communication, works out under the watchful eyes of wife Cathy and GEAR trainer Richard Belton.
Bob Radziewicz, director of print and online journalism at the UM School of Communication, works out under the watchful eyes of wife Cathy and GEAR trainer Richard Belton.

It's been a few short months since participants in the Miller School's Genetics, Exercise, and Research, or GEAR, study started working out and already they are seeing results.

"It's the best thing we've ever done," Bob Radziewicz, director of print and online journalism at UM's School of Communication, said of the free, customized 12-week exercise training program he and his wife just completed. "It really changed our lives, not just physically, but mentally, too. We're more confident and more self-assured about what we can accomplish."

For Radziewicz, 56, a swimmer in college, the one-on-one instruction turned out to be GEAR's best perk. Paired with Richard Belton, a GEAR research team member and former running back at Wake Forest University, Radziewicz said he finally learned how to work out correctly. He also dropped nearly four pants sizes.


 

Miller School Researchers Publish Findings on Obesity Prevention Intervention
2/19/2010

Sarah Messiah, Ph.D.
Sarah Messiah, Ph.D.

Findings from a pilot study, believed to be one of the first designed to examine the effect of a school-based obesity prevention intervention on weight and academic performance, show a decrease in body mass index and an improvement in academic performance among elementary-aged children. The study, conducted by pediatric researchers at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and the Agatston Research Foundation on Miami Beach, was released online today in the prestigious American Journal of Public Health.

Last week in the flagship journal for nutrition, Journal of the American Dietetic Association, results from the same study also showed improvement in weight and blood pressure among the intervention students.

Danielle Hollar, Ph.D.
Danielle Hollar, Ph.D.

The Healthier Options for Public Schoolchildren (HOPS) study was conducted over two school years (2004-05 and 2005-06) and included six elementary schools in Osceola County, Florida. Overall the study included 4,588 children, ages 6 to 13, and more than half were Hispanic. The results published today were based on a subsample of 1,197children who qualified for the Free and Reduce Priced Meals program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture National School Lunch Program.

"The intervention components we tested purposefully brought together groups that did not always work together, such as food service personnel, teachers, parents, community-based nutrition educators, and children, to build a healthy school community that resulted in significant health and academic gains," said Danielle Hollar, Ph.D., voluntary assistant professor of medicine at the Miller School and the study's principal investigator.


 

Drs. Thurer and Keitz Named to New Positions at the Miller School
2/22/2010

Richard Thurer, M.D.
Richard Thurer, M.D.

Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., has announced the appointment of Richard Thurer, M.D., and Sheri Keitz, M.D., Ph.D., to new positions dedicated to enhancing the careers of all Miller School faculty.

Dr. Thurer will become the medical school's ombudsperson, a position he will use to devise a confidential and fair process to serve, support and guide faculty members when they have concerns about their work environment. Dr. Keitz will take over the role of senior associate dean for faculty affairs.

The Ombudsperson Office will serve as an "ear to the people" so that all faculty members at the Miller School can be heard without fear of retaliation or loss of privacy. Dean Goldschmidt said Dr. Thurer is uniquely qualified to serve in his new post, given his lifelong history of service and advocacy for faculty members, first as a member of the Faculty Senate and most recently as senior associate dean for faculty affairs.

Sheri Keitz, M.D., Ph.D.
Sheri Keitz, M.D., Ph.D.

Like Thurer, Keitz also has dedicated her career to supporting faculty members in the academic environment. Since 2007, Keitz has served as associate dean for faculty diversity and development, a role in which she worked to promote respect and responsibility in the workplace for everyone. In her new position, Keitz will be responsible for providing overall leadership and oversight of programs that support faculty in their various academic roles within the Miller School, including recruitment, appointment, development, promotion and tenure. She also will lead the effort for institutional programs pertaining to diversity and equity that will be integrated within the bylaws and structures of the Miller School.


 

President Shalala Addresses the 36th Annual Eastern-Atlantic Student Research Forum
2/19/2010

President Shalala enchanted ESRF attendees with her insights and stories.
President Shalala enchanted ESRF attendees with her insights and stories.

As the Obama administration's stimulus package pours more than $1 billion into comparative effectiveness research, President Donna E. Shalala urged 50 of the world's next generation of physicians and scientists to pursue rigorous evidence-based medicine with an eye on the politics and money that drive it.

"Understand the politics behind this; that this is not simply, "We ought to find the best treatment and we ought to compare treatments and make sure we have the best outcomes," President Shalala told the attendees of the 36th annual Eastern-Atlantic Student Research Forum, or ESRF, on Thursday, the second day of the four-day international symposium.

"There's a lot of money in this business," she continued, "and you have to make sure you have the most credible research and it's published in the finest journals so people will take it seriously. The politics is clearly linked to the money."


 

Daniel Lichtstein, M.D., Appointed Interim Regional Dean
2/18/2010

Daniel M. Lichtstein, M.D.
Daniel M. Lichtstein, M.D.

Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., has announced the appointment of Daniel M. Lichtstein, M.D., to the post of interim regional dean for the Miller School of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University. Dr. Lichtstein, a professor of medicine, has been serving in the role of senior associate regional dean for the Boca Raton-based joint program.

"When we began our medical education partnership in Palm Beach County it was imperative that the Miller School have the best people in leadership positions in order to ensure all our students are educated at the unrelenting high standards the Miller School is known for," said Goldschmidt, who is also senior vice president for medical affairs and CEO of University of Miami Health System - UHealth. "Dr. Lichtstein is an outstanding educator and role model who has been invaluable to the regional campus and we are pleased he will be taking on these additional responsibilities."


 

After the Earthquake, UM's New Ham Radio Station is a Lifeline in Haiti
2/15/2010

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Like so many post-quake emergencies, this one was urgent. Doctors at the University of Miami's hospital in Haiti knew a 13-year-old survivor of the January 12 cataclysm would not live without surgery. But they were not equipped to perform it.

With cell phone and satellite phone coverage spotty, and land lines destroyed, neither could the doctors summon an ambulance nor call other makeshift hospitals to search for one that could help the teen-aged girl.

Fortunately, they had the world's first, and still most reliable, wireless technology just 25 yards outside the hospital's pediatrics tent - the impromptu ham radio station Ronald Bogue, assistant vice president for facilities and services, and UM alumnus Julio Ripoll established to ensure uninterrupted communications between the hospital at the edge of the Port-au-Prince airport and the Global Institute/Project Medishare's Haiti Relief Task Force on the Miller School campus.


 

Miller School Department of Pediatrics Lends Medical Aid to Haiti
2/17/2010

Left to right, Ming-Lon Young, M.D., and Kelvin Lee, M.D., outside Port-au-Prince General Hospital with Dr. Orr, one of two missionary physicians Young and Lee assisted at the facility.
Left to right, Ming-Lon Young, M.D., and Kelvin Lee, M.D., outside Port-au-Prince General Hospital with Dr. Orr, one of two missionary physicians Young and Lee assisted at the facility.
G. Patricia Cantwell, M.D., in action in Port-au-Prince.
G. Patricia Cantwell, M.D., in action in Port-au-Prince.

Like other Miller School departments and divisions, the Department of Pediatrics had physicians travel to Haiti following the catastrophic earthquake in Port-au-Prince. What follows are the recollections of Ming-Lon Young, M.D., interim director of pediatric cardiology, and G. Patricia Cantwell, M.D., chief of pediatric critical care medicine.

* * * * * * * *

Surrounded by a precariously balanced mountain of steel and concrete, the remnants of a leveled building, G. Patricia Cantwell, M.D., suddenly felt the earth lurch sickeningly. She and her fellow rescuers held their breaths, waiting to see if the strong aftershock would unleash an avalanche of rubble on them and the victims they were trying to reach. To the relief of Cantwell and the members of the Urban Search and Rescue Team/South Florida Task Force 2, the wreckage shifted but didn't come cascading down.

Experiencing robust post-quake tremors "was just the most eerie feeling," says Cantwell, who returned to Miami unscathed and who also combed the wreckage of the World Trade Center following 9/11. To break the tension in Port-au-Prince, rescuers sang the words to Carole King's 'I Feel the Earth Move' during aftershocks, recalls Cantwell, who's an Urban Search and Rescue Team medical manager. "It was just a very bizarre feeling."


 

Dr. Pedro Ruiz to Lead Psychiatric Clinical Care at Miller School
2/16/2010

Pedro Ruiz, M.D.
Pedro Ruiz, M.D.

A major figure in American psychiatry is returning to the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Pedro Ruiz, M.D., has been named professor and executive vice chairman and director of clinical programs in the Miller School's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences -- the same place he received his residency training in psychiatry.

"Dr. Ruiz is a skilled administrator, clinician and scholar, and a proven leader," said Charles Nemeroff, M.D., Ph.D., Leonard M. Miller Professor and Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. "I am delighted to have convinced him to return to Miami to oversee clinical service at all of our sites and work with me in recruiting top-notch faculty in psychiatric research and practice."


 

Former UM Urology Chair Dies
2/16/2010

Victor A. Politano, M.D. 1919 - 2010
Victor A. Politano, M.D. 1919 - 2010

Victor Politano, M.D., chairman of urology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine from 1972 - 1990 and professor emeritus, died this weekend at the age of 91. Politano earned numerous accolades and awards during his lengthy career, including the Ramon Guiteras Award from the American Urological Association in 2003 and the Pediatric Urology Medal in 1996. He also served as the President of the American Urological Association in 1984.

Politano is best known for developing what is called the Politano-Leadbetter technique to correct vesicoureteral reflux. This procedure revolutionized the treatment of reflux which caused recurrent urinary tract infections and eventual renal impairment from progressive hydronephrosis and infection. The principle of the surgery was to restore a submucosal tunnel and thus eliminate the reflux of urine to the kidney during increased bladder pressure as in the process of voiding.


 

Miller School Pediatrics Chairman Publishes Editorial on Cardiotoxicity After Childhood Cancer
2/10/2010

Steven E. Lipshultz, M.D.
Steven E. Lipshultz, M.D.

Steven E. Lipshultz, M.D., professor and chairman of pediatrics and associate executive dean for child health at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, co-authored an editorial in the Journal of Clinical Oncology that was released online February 8. The editorial, written with M. Jacob Adams, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, is titled: "Cardiotoxicity After Childhood Cancer: Beginning With the End in Mind." The editorial specifically comments on an original article in the same journal titled: "Role of Cancer Treatment in Long-Term Overall and Cardiovascular Mortality After Childhood Cancer."

Lipshultz is a leading authority on the late effects of treatment on survivors of childhood cancer, specifically the effects on the cardiovascular system when the survivors reach adulthood. In the editorial, the authors underscore the importance of further research to more specifically pinpoint specific treatments and the specific cardiovascular causes of death. As they point out, "the goal of childhood cancer treatment is not only to cure the patient, but to try to ensure that the patient lives as long and as normal a life as possible."


 

Dean Goldschmidt and Marc Buoniconti Cross the Finish Line at ING Marathon
2/1/2010

Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., and Marc Buoniconti, president of The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, approach the finish line at Sunday's ING Half-Marathon.
Miller School Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., and Marc Buoniconti, president of The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, approach the finish line at Sunday's ING Half-Marathon.

As runners and their battered feet crossed the Biscayne Boulevard finish line of the ING Marathon and Half Marathon Sunday morning, the nearly 18,000 men and women signaled victory in various ways: Some raised their hands in triumph, some struck happy poses, and some collapsed in the arms of marathon officials who promptly took them to be checked out by Miller School physicians and volunteers who staffed a UHealth clinic at the event.

Among the throng of triumphant was Marc Buoniconti, President of The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis and The Buoniconti Fund to Cure Paralysis, who rolled his wheelchair across the finish line with Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., by his side. They broke out in smiles and Dean Goldschmidt, who was participating in his third ING Marathon, made the victory symbol and then hoisted a sign that said, "Run for those who can't."


 

Study Shows GHRH-Agonists Can Activate Cardiac Repair After Myocardial Infarction
1/18/2010

Rosemeire M. Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Ph.D, Joshua M. Hare, M.D., Andrew V. Schally, Ph.D., M.D.h.c., D.Sc.h.c., and Anna Klukovits, Ph.D.
Rosemeire M. Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Ph.D, Joshua M. Hare, M.D., Andrew V. Schally, Ph.D., M.D.h.c., D.Sc.h.c., and Anna Klukovits, Ph.D.

Despite major therapeutic advances, congestive heart failure remains a leading cause of death and disability. There is currently no therapy that fully reverses heart failure and/or left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, leaving physicians with a great need for viable treatments.

A team of physician-scientists from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, including a Nobel Laureate, have demonstrated that growth hormone-releasing hormone agonists (GHRH-A) can stimulate major recovery of the heart injured by a heart attack. GHRH is a master regulator of growth hormone that is produced by the brain. Joshua M. Hare, M.D., Louis Lemberg Professor of Medicine in the Cardiovascular Division, was the principal investigator of the study that included fifteen researchers, among them co-senior author Andrew V. Schally, Ph.D., M.D.h.c., D.Sc.h.c., the 1977 Nobel Prize winner for Physiology or Medicine, Distinguished Medical Research Scientist of the Department of Veterans Affairs, distinguished professor in the Department of Pathology at the Miller School of Medicine. Their work is published in the January 18 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


 


News >>

Miller School and College of Engineering Host Third Collaborative Research Exchange Forum to Discuss Innovations in Medical Devices and Biomaterials

Personalized medicine for everyone.

Dean Goldschmidt Challenges All to Get in GEAR and in Shape at the Medical Wellness Center in the New Year

Dean Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., kicked off the Medical Wellness Center’s “Be the Best You’ve Ever Been” annual New Year event Tuesday by extolling the benefits of exercise confirmed by Miller School researchers – and the yoga, aqua, cycling, and other fitness classes and programs offered at the world-class gym.

Most Advanced CyberKnife Comes to Sylvester

UM Physicians to Develop Unique Treatments South Florida patients who are candidates for radiosurgery now have the most advanced technology available at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of UHealth – University of Miami Health System.

TeleHealth Program at UM Health System Receives Verizon Grant

The TeleHealth program at UHealth-University of Miami Health System has received a $24,500 grant from the Verizon Foundation to use telemedicine to provide pediatric specialty care to underinsured and underserved students in the North Miami Beach feeder pattern of the Miami-Dade County Public School System.

Dr. Jerry Goodwin Named to New Position at Sylvester

Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs and Dean of the Miller School of Medicine, has appointed W. Jarrard Goodwin, M.D., Chief Medical Officer of the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center and the University of Miami Hospital and Clinics.

Phase III Trial Shows Biomarkers Predict p53 Gene Therapy Efficacy

Discovery Allows Selection of Treatment for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck In most cases, patients with recurrent, late-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck are facing a disease that is incurable.

 

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